Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Solange Knowles on the Cover of Interview Magazine


Ever since Solange Knowles dropped 'A Seat at the Table', I had it on heavy rotation. She scored her first number album on the Billboard 200 chart along with Grammy nominations. Also she is Interview magazine's newest cover star and I am digging her close-up beauty look. In the issue in which she is being interviewed by big sister Beyonce, she talks womanism, growing up in a hair salon, what Beyonce was like as a sister growing up and so much more. Continue below to read some excerpts from her interview. For more on Solo's feature, visit InterviewMagazine.com.




BEYONCÉ: What else attracted you growing up?


SOLANGE: I remember having so much perspective about my voice, and how to use my voice, at such a young age—whether it was through dance, poetry, or coming up with different projects. I guess I always felt a yearning to communicate—I had a lot of things to say. And I appreciated y'all's patience in the house during all of these different phases. They were not ever very introverted, quiet phases.

BEYONCÉ: No, not at all. [both laugh] I remember thinking, "My little sister is going to be something super special," because you always seemed to know what you wanted. And I'm just curious, where did that come from? 

SOLANGE: I have no idea, to be honest! I always knew what I wanted. We damn sure know that I wasn't always right. [both laugh] But I'd sit firm, whether I was right or wrong. I guess a part of that was being the baby of the family and being adamant that, in a house of five, my voice was being heard. Another part is that I remember being really young and having this voice inside that told me to trust my gut. And my gut has been really, really strong in my life. It's pretty vocal and it leads me. Sometimes I haven't listened, and those times didn't end up very well for me. I think all of our family—you and mom—we're all very intuitive people. A lot of that comes through our mother, her always following her gut, and I think that spoke to me really loudly at a young age and encouraged me to do the same.

BEYONCÉ: Your voice on the album, the tone of your voice, the vulnerability in your voice and in your arrangements, the sweetness and the honesty and purity in your voice—what inspired you to sing in that tone? 

SOLANGE: It was very intentional that I sang as a woman who was very in control, a woman who could have this conversation without yelling and screaming, because I still often feel that when black women try to have these conversations, we are not portrayed as in control, emotionally intact women, capable of having the hard conversations without losing that control. I had not really explored my falsetto as much on previous works. As you said, I have always loved Minnie Riperton, and I loved Syreeta Wright and really identified with a few of her songs that she and Stevie Wonder did. She was saying some really tough shit, but the tone of her voice was so sweet that you could actually hear her more clearly. I wanted to find a happy medium, feeling like I was being direct and clear, but also knowing that this was a conversation that I was very much in control of—able to have that moment, to exist in it, to live in it and ponder it, not to yell and scream and fight my way through it—I was doing enough of that in my life, so I wanted to make a clear distinction of me controlling that narrative. Aaliyah was also a huge influence and has always been. Her vocal arrangements with Static Major are some of my favorite in the world. 

BEYONCÉ: And, honestly, growing up, how did I do as a big sister?

SOLANGE: You did a kickass job. You were the most patient, loving, wonderful sister ever. In the 30 years that we've been together, I think we've only really, like, butted heads ... we can count on one hand. 

BEYONCÉ: I was expecting something funny, but I'll take it. Thank you.




Credit: Interview magazine


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