Friday, November 3, 2017

Kate Winslet, Ruth Negga & Jody Foster on the December 2017 Cover of Harper's Bazaar UK Magazine


Kate Winslet, Ruth Negga and Jodie Foster are the December 2017 cover stars of Harper's Bazaar magazine. On the cover, Kate Winslet is wearing a GIORGIO ARMANI dress & HARRY WINSTON jewelry, Ruth Negga is RALPH & RUSSO FALL 2017 COUTURE and Jodie Foster is wearing a black blazer. Continue below to see Kate, Ruth & Jodie's individual covers and to read excerpts from their interview. For more on Kate's feature click HERE, Ruth click HERE and Jodie, click HERE. You can pick up a copy on newsstand today. 




On why she loves being in her forties:
I don’t mind being 42 and not 22. I’m honestly OK not being sent scripts anymore where the main requirement is to be easy on the eye. I’m loving playing women who are more worn-in because of life experience. And it takes away the pressure of needing to conform, which I’ve never been very good at anyway.

On why she’ll never stop acting:
I don’t want to be a person who won an Oscar and then disappeared off the face of the Earth. I want to be the person who is still here acting their socks off aged 90. And you don’t get there by being complacent.

On why she’ll never stop acting:
I don’t want to be a person who won an Oscar and then disappeared off the face of the Earth. I want to be the person who is still here acting their socks off aged 90. And you don’t get there by being complacent.

On whether she still comes under scrutiny for her appearance:
Not so much. We have celebrated curves more in the last five years.

On the dangers of social media:
I do worry about the extra pressure to be ‘perfect’ on girls growing up now. I’m obsessed about the misuse and potential perils of social media for our younger generation. We need to be aware of how damaging to children’s self-esteem and the natural process of growing up certain aspects of this ‘sharing’ are.





On being the only black child at school:
You’re outside of something which gives you a unique perspective. You become very observant and sensitive to people’s mood shifts. You see people assessing you. That’s really intriguing. You learn to shapeshift. If that’s a positive or negative, I’m not sure. It’s about survival.

On how the death of her father when she was a child changed her:
Someone once told me that whatever age a parent dies, as you barrel towards it you go, ‘Have I achieved enough?’” (Her father died when he was 40, Negga is now 36). “I think your sense of time gets warped because you realise, especially if you’ve lost a parent early on, that it’s not infinite. Things die and things go away.

On feeling like a misfit:
I’m quite tricky to put in anything. I don’t think people really ever know what to do with me. It doesn’t bother me at all. It’s given me the impetus to create things. I don’t need to be an actor. I used to, but not any more. I think at some point I’ll resist people telling me what to do.




On how her intense relationship with her mother:
I wanted to be meaningful. That’s to do with my mom, and the way I was raised. It’s a mission I’ve been on since I was a child. I wanted to be meaningful for her, in some ways…I had to be good. If you asked me to do 120 takes, I would do 120 takes and never lose focus…if I was good my mother wouldn’t leave me or I wouldn’t be cast aside. I had to prove it over and over again.

On the impact of being a child star:
I have childhood-celebrity trauma. It’s almost impossible for me to use my face or my celebrity to sell anything. It makes me break out in hives. I appreciate that other people do it, and I see the benefit of it, and that they really get stuff done – but I just can’t do it.

On how she learnt to be comfortable in her own skin:
You get to a certain age, and you think – hey, I’m good! I don’t have to be doing this over and over again! So maybe there’s a way of being less hard on myself, and more flexible about what the rules are.

On the benefits of aging:
I’ve learnt how much joy comes from passing on what you know, even in the smallest of ways. After 50 years, you have an obligation to give your knowledge away – that’s the next level of pleasure.

Credit: Harper's Bazaar UK


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